Becoming a freelancer – what you need to know

So you think you’re ready to drop the corporate life and become a freelancer. Now what?

There’s a lot of planning that goes into this, so let me share my experience and the steps I took to finally take the freelance plunge while based in Dubai. Some of these points are universal, and some specific to where I live, so I’ll mark them accordingly!

The one important thing I will say before writing more is that you not only have to put in a lot of work after starting your own business, but before jumping into freelance life as well. You have to plan a lot before freelancing – it’s not the romantic ideal of ‘I’m going to leave the 9-5 and work in my pajamas!’. It really isn’t (ok, it can be on a few days but it’s not the norm!).

Ask yourself some important questions!

I thought about the freelance decision long (and by that, I mean for months at end) and hard – WAY before I resigned from my full-time job. Am I ready to leave the structured, corporate life? Is there a market for the services I’d be able to offer? Will I make any money?! Here’s some more questions to get you started:

  • “Why am I even thinking of this step?”
    If it’s to escape ‘the man’ and no other thought, stop right there. Re-evaluate. Think about why you’d like to take on a role that could be quite unpredictable. If you thrive on structure and a 9-5 style role, maybe this isn’t for you. You need to have a really clear – and sustainable – reason about why you are entering this phase of your career.
  • “OK, what services will I offer?”
    This can be an easy or hard question to answer. If you’re a graphic designer, then you know what you can do for potential clients. Sometimes, you have multiple skillsets that you can translate into a variety of services. First put these together – just write them down somewhere. You need to know exactly what you can and cannot do. And certainly don’t do things you have no skill for. You have no idea how many times I’ve now heard the phrase ‘I can’t believe you’re being honest with me’ when I turn down a potential job because I tell them it’s not something I am good at and therefore cannot do it.
  • “Who will my clients be?”
    It’s very important to figure this out. Are you going to specialise in a sector? Do you have existing contacts who could become clients? Is there a niche that you can tap into, and be good at? Again, work this all out.
  • “What steps do I need to take next? Are they feasible?”
    So that’s the next sub-head!
Plan, Plan, Plan

After thinking about your decision, you think you’re ready. Now you’re wondering what happens next!

  • This bullet point is specifically for people in the UAE: Figure out what kind of visa you want. There’s a myriad of options in the UAE right now – you can set up as a freelancer, you can set up a free zone company. What are you hoping to do? Are you a one-wo/man band? Are you planning to build an empire? I personally went for a freelance visa, so I’ll start outlining data on that front where relevant.
  • Once you know what kind of visa you want, it’s crunch time. Can you afford this? I’ve highlighted this because it really is ridiculously important. I created a spreadsheet with initial estimates of all costs I would incur, and then budgeted for it. I knew then how much cash flow I’d need to be able to pay for everything without going bankrupt. Some of these costs will include those you didn’t even think about (the struggle is real). My own costs included the following: the permit/licence; what’s known as an establishment card (if you’re getting your own visa rather than staying on your father’s or husband’s); visa; visa amendment (paperwork related to my previous visa); website hosting costs; website design costs; express service for the visa (I had to travel very soon but this is not essential); health insurance. Please, please, please have enough money to pay for all these and still have a comfortable amount left over for living costs for the next few months. You need to have enough so that if you earned little to nothing for a month or two, you won’t struggle.
  • Find out right then what paperwork you’ll need for all the steps of the process. Get started with keeping these ready way before you even start filing everything.
  • You know what else is part of the planning process? Reaching out to your contacts. Speak to them to let them know about your move and when you will be ‘open for business’. While this could potentially help with future business, it’s also best practice for your interaction with people you may have developed a good working relationship with. Sometimes that leads to business, sometimes it doesn’t. But never underestimate the value of your contact book.
  • Pricing. This is SO important, and was actually one of the things I left to the last minute. I wish I hadn’t! There’s a lot of ways to figure out your rates for the services you offer. You may work in an industry where rates are fairly standardised so price yourself correctly. Remember this, you have to account for EVERYTHING now, it’s not just about the service but about the equipment you use, wear-and-tear, even software you may need to do your job. I used this infographic to help me work out my charges.
  • Also, plan for when you’re actually going to submit your application to be a registered or licensed freelancer. My advice is leaving enough time between your leaving your full-time role and applying for your freelance permit so the processes tick over in the background. Do NOT quit your job before you have the alternative confirmed – whether that’s a freelance permit or visa, or even your first client.
Just do it!

This section is quite specific to Dubai folk – you can skip to the next section if this isn’t relevant to you!

  • I applied for my freelance permit at the end of June, knowing I’d be leaving my full-time job at the end of July. If you’ve already got all the paperwork ready, then it’s a simple matter of submitting all the information.
  • I personally found GoFreelance amazing to deal with. When I applied, just ‘education’ and ‘media’ activities were on the roster, now ‘tech’ is also available. What I also loved that it outlines exactly what you need for the application which goes back to my point about preparing all your paperwork in advance. The team there are also super helpful. Follow the instructions, and go for it!
  • Extra tip: Start the health insurance process well before you have to apply for your visa. When you submit the visa paperwork + get your medical done, the visa cannot be processed unless you have health insurance. Shopping around for insurance and getting it underwritten takes time. I got a basic insurance at the time because I needed my visa quickly in order to travel soon, but it’s been months of searching for the right one and I finally signed off on one I was satisfied with at the end of December 2018.
Living that freelancer life

OK so you have taken the plunge. You’re a freelancer. Congratulations. Now what? Now…you hustle.

  • Remember all those contacts you reached out to? Well, if you haven’t posted about your move on LinkedIn already, then post away. Let the world know you’re ready for business.
  • Do you have a website yet? On a personal level, I decided to include the website in the planning phase (I worked with the amazing Rubber Design for this) and had it ready to go just before my last day at my full-time job. I personally felt it was important to have a place where all my skills were outlined, and in a professional manner. Vicki from Rubber Design created my logo and the website, and I also had a photoshoot with Aasiya Jagadeesh.
  • What about your social media? Can you use it to your advantage? Don’t forget to post updates about your work, being out and about, or just plugging away your services. It was hard for me to do this, I almost felt a sense of being shameless, but hey, you have to hustle.
  • Network! Depending on what your work is, find a way to connect with both existing contacts regularly and make new ones. Hustle away, go out to events, hand out business cards (on that note, if you’re in the UAE and want business cards – or anything else – printed, head to Pearl Printing Press; you can email Joel at pearlpp.dxb@gmail.com).
  • Be methodical. OK, some of your freelance work may mean you have to go into an office to work – in which case you’re still experiencing a sense of structure. Or your work may mean you can be huddled in a tent on top of a mountain with portable Wi-FI getting your emails out (unlikely, but who knows?!). In the former, OK, you’re sorted in that you have to be there at 9am, or whatever the case may be, and work through the day. For the latter, or more realistically, if you work from home or from a café or a co-working space, have some structure. Wake up at the same time every day, start work at a similar time every day. It’s up to you whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, set your own work timings and largely stick to them. It will help you get work done. No structure altogether seriously does not help.

So, here’s my guide and my experience taking the freelance plunge. What questions, if any, do you have for me? Comment here, and I’ll try to answer as many as I can! And good luck with your freelance journey!

And finally, because I now have to continuously hustle, check out my website and let me know if you have any professional needs I can help with!

cropped-fq8a1206P.S. – I am considering writing posts about apps I’m using as a freelancer and where I enjoy working from in Dubai; if that’s of interest, do let me know!

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Ten Food Commandments with Jay Rayner

Once I booked my flights to London, I knew what I had to do: check if there were any shows in the city I wanted to see. While on this hunt, I thankfully remembered to check if Jay Rayner had any shows on during my trip. I got lucky, there was a ‘Ten Food Commandments’ show on September 11 – the day I landed in London. I knew I’d most likely be jet-lagged that evening but there were no other shows during my trip, so I bit the bullet and bought a ticket.

Right, so I haven’t read the book on which the performance is based but I knew that whatever the show would end up being, I would be treated to a heavy dose of tongue-in-cheek and witty observations. Thankfully, I wasn’t wrong.

I headed off to The Crazy Coqs, which is located within Brasserie Zedel, just off the Piccadilly Circus station. Guests were queuing up in this basement-level foyer, which had some stunning murals and architecture. I looked it up while writing this post, and found out that the building, now restored, is a loyal retelling of its original 1930s Art Deco style. The room which houses the Crazy Coqs used to be the billiard room, and, according to the official website, has been restored faithfully.

Now – on the show! Once we were admitted to the intimate round venue, all clustered around a mini stage at one end, the show began when Rayner appeared in his Moses outfit…

The show started at 9.15pm and ended at 10.45pm, which included a 10 minute break. The first part of the show concentrated on the ten (food) commandments, peppered with interesting anecdotes that played into those commandments, as well as some brilliant jokes. After a 10-minute interval, before which he encouraged the crowd to tweet him with food commandments of their own, he returned and started reading those tweets and interacting with the tweeters and sharing his opinions. After that was an open Q&A, and then he stayed behind to sell and sign his books.

If you’re interested in the culture of food, and enjoy reading his restaurant reviews every week – this is definitely a good show to catch.

Let me leave you with one of my favourite quotes of the night: “People don’t go to restaurants to stave off rickets. People go to restaurants to collect memories.”

Want to learn how to swim in Dubai?

OK, so as of the beginning of April 2018, I didn’t know how to swim. As a child, I was never sent to a swimming class, and I eventually developed a fear of going anywhere beyond the shallow side of the pool, or letting go of the wall. Worse, I have friends who have tales of how I jumped onto them out of fear pushing them under water, or grabbed on so tight when they were trying to help me learn how to swim that I left nail marks on their skin, or… You get the picture.

Anyway, in March this year (just before I managed to pinch my sciatica, aggravate my scoliosis and end up in a back brace – yep that’s another story), I saw a swimming class for adults wanting to learn on GuavaPass. I thought, doesn’t hurt to try this out, right? Right? On April 1, off I toddled to the location and got into the pool. I enjoyed that first class so much I signed up for the next term (it’s not on GuavaPass, you go directly through the academy), and then continued through the summer classes. Yep, it was pretty much the only thing I could do while undergoing physiotherapy.

And finally, on August 29, it happened… I swam the entire length of the pool! Not very gracefully, and certainly not in a conventional manner, but, nonetheless, I did!

Swimming - Devina

Since I started my journey, I have been sharing updates on social media, and what has been great to see has been all the responses – from people who can swim encouraging me, as well as those who, like me, have managed to reach adulthood without learning this skill.

So, how did I go from being terrified in the pool to bobbing about in the deep end?

TLDR: Go to Urban Swim Academy (find the academy on Facebook here or on Instagram here).

But to find out why I have stuck with them and what makes them a good shout to learn how to swim – or indeed, go for the masters classes if you’re already a swimmer – read on.

I cannot continue this post without mentioning the instructor for the ‘adults learn to swim’ class: Diana Mruk. I genuinely do not know how or if I would have ever been able to get here without her. Her insanely patient nature is why she put up with me and my fear – there were days when I just stood at the edge of the pool for minutes, freaking out about gliding because how would I survive, or days when I somehow managed to go underwater and then panicked while trying to stand up from a float, and so many other random moments.

What I also LOVE about her is her ability to take on your individual quirks to make them work for you. It’s never been about the “right” or “traditional” way to do things, it’s about, how can we make this work for you? I have so many examples (and honestly I feel really silly because of this but hey ho) to share. Here’s just one: My core has no strength or balance, so it was a struggle learning how to get out of a front float in the first place, but what’s been even more difficult has been the freestyle stokes, because every time I turned to take a breath, I’d lost control of my body and flip on my back, like a helpless turtle. While this has caused plenty of merry mirth among my friends, it’s clearly a problem if I can’t do anything after that except float uselessly. Diana helped me convert that problem into an advantage… I now take a few strokes, flip on my back, and then flip again and keep moving forward. It’s not the most elegant way of swimming a length but until I can figure out how to balance my body, this works!

Everything was a milestone to Diana, and to me. It honestly felt like no one was cheering for me as hard as she was. Learned how to float? WAHEY! Learned how to get out of a float? High-five! (Seriously, it took me a while to sink from a float.) Worked out how to tread? YASSSS! And so on.

Our classes happen at the same time as the ‘masters’ sessions, and while I have never had to work with him, I see Brett Hallam (the academy director) training veritable merpeople as they swim multiple lengths, with the same passion and dedication that Diana has always shown us. All the advanced students I’ve interacted with before we begin class seem to love coming there and polishing up their skills, so there are classes for accomplished swimmers as well.

So where are these amazing classes? Up until August 2018, Urban Swim Academy was using the pool of a school in Umm Suqeim. But from the start of the September term, we will be at Talise Fitness at Madinat Jumeirah. All you need to do is contact the academy and they will share term times, prices, and so on. It’s totally worth it. SEE YOU THERE!

And I’m proof that it really is never too late to learn how to swim. I absolutely love it, and my goal is to one day join the more advanced class, and I’m pretty sure I’ll get there – especially if the amazing instructors at Urban Swim are there to help me.

Where to try barre in Dubai

So after my ‘where to Zumba’ and ‘where to learn dancing’ posts, it occurred to me that I’ve also tried quite a few barre classes in Dubai and figured I’d share my experiences to anyone else interested. And if you scroll all the way down, I’ve got my GuavaPass referral code if anyone would like to sign up.

First of all, what is barre? So barre combines a range of disciplines from ballet poses (we are on tiptoes for quite a bit, for example) through to yoga and pilates, along with using weights where necessary. There is the barre that is used for balance for a few reps. It’s quite a workout, one that you do barefoot, or with grip socks. I have scoliosis, but despite that, I am able to work out quite effectively with barre. I’d of course recommend you mention any and all problems to your instructor, but also definitely know your own body. If it hurts, stop.

So here are the studios (and in some cases, instructors) that I like (in alphabetical order!!!):

Cafe de La Danse
Located on Al Wasl Road in Dubai, there is a ‘booty barre’ class and a ‘power barre’ class, which is the intermediate version of the former. I’ve only been to the booty barre classes so far and most of them have been taught by the studio’s founder, Milla Tenorio. There’s a healthy mixture of the barre, weights and matwork, and what I like is during some of the mat exercises, she comes over to help us stretch our bodies, which is great to improve our elasticity and flexibility.

DEFINE body & mind
This studio is in Dubai Marina, within Silverene Tower B. I’m not entirely sure how to get there without going through the Dubai Marina Mall, but I’ve not gone there often enough to figure that bit out yet. This class [titled DEFINE body (barre)] is almost military in its preciseness and approach, and there’s a very clever use of what can be misconstrued as a small space. You pick a spot in front of the barre where the mat, weights and exercise bands await. The music is loud and pumping, and the instructor is tough but encouraging.

DS2dio
So I’ve mentioned this studio before when talking about dance. But I’ve also tried its booty barre class, which is pretty good. The studio, located in Cluster T of Jumeirah Lakes Towers, is smaller, but there’s movable barres so the space is flexible to the various exercises. I’ve done this one just once, but I had a good experience and would return.

Pilates Academy
Located on the 42nd floor or Jumeirah Bay X2 Tower in Cluster X, Jumeirah Lakes Towers, this studio is probably my favourite right now for barre. I’ve been taught by Victoria so far and she is amazing! The studio is spacious, and there’s such an inviting feeling as soon as you walk in. The exercises are tough, but the instructor is an absolute joy to work with. I’m not sure if it’s how green, woody, and open the entire studio is, I just feel uplifted when I walk in. A combination of the music, the instructor’s cheerfulness, and the exercise is why I think I’ll definitely be a regular there.

Yoga House
Really love this studio and its overall aesthetic; it’s located in The Greens area, in building 4 of the Emaar Business Park. It has quite a few – you guessed it – yoga classes, but there’s also a barre offering. I’ve had two different instructors every time I’ve gone there, and both have had different styles yet equally effective in working out the body. I’ve always felt like I push myself to the max and beyond when I do this class, and leave feeling refreshed.

So there you have it, it’s my round-up of barre classes and studios in Dubai I have personally tried and like.

As always, if you’d like to try GuavaPass, click here for my referral code! Enjoy barre-ing, among many other things!

Put those dancing shoes on – in Dubai

OK so I’ve always loved dancing. It’s why I enjoy Zumba as a form of exercise so much – it combines dancing and music to create a great workout. But I’ve already told you about where to try Zumba in Dubai (and I’ll keep updating that post as I try – and like – more places, so keep checking), so this isn’t about that. It’s about dance.

If you pop into my YouTube search history, apart from Stephen Colbert, John Oliver etc, you’ll find choreography videos. I discovered them quite by accident one night, and since then I’ve been hooked.

Some of these are ridiculously mesmerising – this one with Matt Steffanina and Dana Alexa is just mad cool.

And I mean, I’m currently in love with this choreo by Phil Wright – linking my tweet so you can click through both videos of the same song:

And for good measure, watch this choreo all the way to the end where he proposes to his girlfriend mid-filming – the choreography is great + it’s so sweet!

So while Zumba was satisfying my twinkle toes, I needed more. So far I’ve tried and liked the following two places. As with the Zumba post, I’ll update if I find more – and more importantly, like them. If I don’t like it, I won’t recommend it OR even bother giving it a bad review.

For actual choreography classes…

…head over for the Dance Pak DXB class, hands down. Held at Train SF in Al Quoz, this class is easily something I now look forward to every Sunday through to Tuesday. Nicole Olaivar, who teaches the class, is ridiculously inspirational. Her dance moves and facial expressions while dancing are mesmerising. She’s great at teaching steps and choreo, and also pointing out very honestly where we mess up – so that we can improve. Sunday and Tuesday are the choreo combined with twerking and strength building. She also now does one hour of dancing without choreo every Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Give it a go (if you plan on joining GuavaPass btw, my referral code is at the end of this post)!

For some reggateon…

…head to DSt2dio. There are classes on Monday and Wednesday, with a great teacher and dancer, Juan Saturria. There aren’t specific songs/dances which you learn class on class; rather, this is more about the movements and steps in general that comprise the art form that is reggaeton. He has a way of teaching us the steps and movements in a way we can understand and always performs the entire dance once for us at the end so we can record and practice on our own time too. This studio offers quite a few dance classes, and while I haven’t tried all of them, if they are of the same calibre, I think it’d be totally worth it.

Both these classes are on GuavaPass, so if you want to sign up, here’s my referral code:  http://guavapass.com/refer?t=DevinaLovesGuava609

Literaturhaus at Nadi – an ode to literature at Dubai’s Alserkal Avenue

Literaturhaus at Nadi – an ode to literature at Dubai’s Alserkal Avenue

Earlier this month, I attended the launch of Literaturhaus at Nadi, which is a literary event that will continue to be hosted at Nadi Al Quoz every Saturday until September 30. The first Saturday was helmed by Afra Atiq, an Emirati spoken word poet. She was mesmerising, to say the least. This was my first time attending a poetry slam performance, and I really enjoyed it.

Afra used themes she identified with personally, and certainly themes a lot of people in the audience identified with as well, considering the applause she got in response! Starting off with an ode to true love (food, and its fickle nature), to schoolyard bullying, to being labelled ‘different’, to dealing with heartbreak, Afra used the power of words to really bring a sense of energy and empathy in the room… I know I was nearly in tears at some points.

I love the vibe Dubai’s culture and literary scene has right now, and Literaturhaus at Nadi seems like an amazing opportunity for people to sample what the city’s literary artists have to offer. It’s not just poetry, the programming offers up authors, historians, musicians and much more.

The events are free to attend, but there is limited space to do RSVP.

All info on the link here

Want to try Zumba in Dubai? Here’s where I go!

Note: I will update this list as I keep trying Zumba classes around town!

A few years ago, I discovered Zumba, and oddly enough, through work. My company regularly hosts “Wellness Weeks” every few months, and during one of these weeks, a Zumba dance studio (now unfortunately defunct) was offering classes. Since then I’ve been hooked.

After that dance studio shut down, I have been more experimental, trying different classes across Dubai. Right now, I’m exploring exercise classes in Dubai via GuavaPass (click here to get AED 100 off your first month through my referral link btw), and I figured I might as well share my favourite Zumba classes across the city – and to tell you it’s not necessarily about the studio, but it’s definitely ALL about the teacher. So even if the studio isn’t your favourite, if the teacher is, then you *will* return.

I’ve grouped these into the studios I have frequented, and mentioned who the instructors are. Happy dancing!!!

Iconic Fitness (previously known as CoreFit)

One of the earliest places I tried was CoreFit (now called Iconic Fitness), and while the instructors have changed from years ago, I’ve never been happier. One of the instructors is Jed (or @masterjedai as he is on social media) and the other regular is Leonardo (@zumbaleonardo on Instagram). Every now and then, the venue hosts Zumba parties, with not just Jed and Leo, but also Enzo Maglaque (see GFX, below) and Joseph DeLeon – I’d highly recommend these parties. High energy, full of fun, and great music and dancing.

CoreFit has Zumba classes every day, so take your pick! It’s located in Dubai Marina, right next to the tram station in front of Horizon Tower, and there’s usually quite a bit of parking – especially for the weekend classes! The studio is very large, so it’s great to spread out and dance without worrying about walking on someone else’s foot!

Couple of videos… One from Jed’s YouTube!

Another one from Leonardo’s YouTube:

Tempo Dance Center

So, Jed really is one of my favourite instructors and when I discovered he also taught at Tempo Dance Center in JLT’s Red Diamond building, I had to try it out. As I said, it’s in Jumeirah Lakes Towers, but not within the clusters. It’s towards the back on the road between JLT and Emirates Hills. Google Maps will definitely show you the exact way! Tempo Dance Center is on the first floor of the building and has three rooms for dance classes. I’d say about 10-15 people can fit comfortably, so do book in advance. There is parking below, but on some evenings it can get crowded, so bear that in mind before heading out there.

Dream Master Studio, Al Quoz

The first time I did Zumba was with Monica Pulgarin, and it’s really down to her that I’ve stuck it out so long. She now has her classes at the Dream Master Studio in Al Quoz, and these are a mix of Zumba Fitness and Zumba Toning. Often, she and another amazing instructor, Maira Lorena, team up for the “14 Day Zumba Challenge” which they share on their Facebook pages, so keep an eye out for these events, and don’t hesitate to sign up if you can commit to all 14 days. So, the challenge is two hours every night for 14 days, except for Friday. And it’s one of my most favourite things to do when it comes around!

GFX

There are two GFX branches in Dubai, one in Business Bay and the other in Mirdiff. I haven’t been to the latter, but have to the former. Every class I’ve done at this studio has had Enzo, and I will guarantee that he’s always going to put you through an intense workout. The studio is located on the first floor of the Bay Avenue Mall, and is compact, but can fit in a good number of dancers. He offers a regular Fitness class, and a Toning version, so you have a few options. I haven’t tried Mirdiff’s studio, but if anyone tries it out, do let me know!

So, which Zumba classes have you tried out? Let me know if there’s something I have missed and should try out.

Thoughts on getting fancy schmancy nails done

People who know me very well will know I can’t really be bothered with make-up, or manicures, and so on. But with a three week-long holiday upon me, including a full-blown Indian wedding and then Christmas, I decided to take the plunge and try this long-lasting nail polish thingybob I’d heard about.

I was told by reliable sources that there are two types of long-lasting nail procedures: Gelish and Shellac. My parlour (YES, YEGADS, I HAVE ONE!) does the former, so I was set.

I chose to have a French manicure, which was a big mistake (more on that later). Essentially, they keep applying goop on your nails, then plonk it in a little box that “cooks the nails” (the parlour lady’s words, not mine) and then voila… nails that don’t chip. Which is, frankly, a miracle when it comes to me. I’m the girl who gets a manicure once a year then smudges it within 7 minutes of leaving the parlour. I have, on occasion, done it while still inside the premises.

But nope, errant zippers and my own clumsy will were befuddled this time as my nails lived on. As if they were done yesterday.

So why was the French manicure a mistake? Mostly because after two weeks my nails obviously grew longer and there was this weird shadow effect on my nails where the white bit of the manicure was shorter than my actual white nail underneath and it just looked odd. If and when I do it again, I’d probably go for a block colour to prevent zombie nails from returning.

And I didn’t even take a photo…

Stationery I love: Surat Journals, your little blank book

Stationery I love: Surat Journals, your little blank book

On December 13, 2014, I stumbled across a little pop-up market at DUCTAC, Mall of the Emirates. I’d just gone there to return books to my library (it’s called The Old Library, if anyone’s interested, and it’s fabulous). While I browsed the stands, this one caught my eye. Books – an easy way to get my attention.

It turned out to be blank books (‘little blank books’, even) created with leather from the Philippines, and recycled paper. Shut with a strip of leather, I thought the books were stylish, eye-catching, and an attractive companion for people who take notes, and enjoy stationery. Very affordable too, as you can see from the pictures. The one I picked up was AED 80, and it was to be a Christmas present – and the recipient seemed to love it, so that’s a job well done! I now regret not getting one for myself, so that’s on my to-do list.

The founder is a man named Ken Surat (hence the name Surat Journals) and here’s the Surat Journals Facebook page if you’re interested in getting a book for yourself.

Lush’s 12 Days of Christmas

Lush’s 12 Days of Christmas

I’ve loved Lush for a while now. I can’t remember when I first discovered the gorgeous smells the company produces, but I was instantly hooked. Recently, I wandered over to the Lush Christmas event in Dubai, and boy, was that literally a feast for the senses! New products, new colours and beautiful gift boxes everywhere.

Some Instagram photos from the day here:

At the end of the media preview, we all walked away with this beauty: the 12 Days of Christmas box.

12 Days of Christmas box

Here’s what I found when I unboxed:

I haven’t started using these yet, but I tried a few of them at the media preview, and I cannot wait to pamper myself. The Christmas range should be available in UAE Lush stores this week – are you tempted?

Do you have a favourite Lush product? Which one is it? Let me know!