Book reviews: Discworld #31-35

And we’re back!

Earlier installments: Books 1-4, Books 5-10, Books 11-15, Books 16-20, Books 21-30

Monstrous Regiment: Discworld, #31

Can I say that this is absolutely my favourite??? I read this via a copy from my library, and I need to buy my own copy. There’s a war ongoing, and Polly’s brother Paul has been missing since he joined up. She decides it’s time to find him and the only way to do that is join the army. The problem? They don’t accept women. So she cuts her hair, wears male clothing and adopts ways of behaviour that include burping, scratching and walking in a ‘male’ manner. She signs up, along with a vampire, a troll, a zombie, and many more odd members. As she goes along with the charade, she finds that everyone is hiding their own secrets – and learns the value of a well-placed sock! Pratchett was a feminist, really, and it comes across in this book. Regular characters from Discworld have cameos, like Vimes, Willam de Worde and more. This book is the third in the Industrial Revolution sub-series.

A Hat Full of Sky: Discworld #32

The second Tiffany Aching book is excellent. I know I wasn’t enthusiastic about the first, but this one is brilliant. I went in with zero expectations and really liked it. Tiffany is such a resourceful young girl, and Granny Weatherwax such a wise woman – having them almost ‘work’ together was a joy to read. Tiffany is sent to apprentice with Miss Level, but finds that something is following her. The Nac Mac Feegles have sensed this too, and eventually go off to rescue the big wee hag.

Going Postal: Discworld #33

Forming part of both the Industrial Revolution and the Moist von Lipwig series, I enjoyed reading this book the second time around, about five years after I read it the first time. Moist is a 26-year-old expert con-man, who has literally and figuratively reached the end of the rope – or has he? Lord Vetinari steps in, and Moist is given another shot at life – as the man in charge of the now-defunct Post Office. With the Grand Trunk Company more sinister than ever, will Moist be able to resurrect the Post Office and make it profitable? In a way, now that I’m reading the Discworld books in chronological order, the more I appreciate Vetinari. His character is impressive, and the way in which he masterfully deals with the ‘enemies’ of Ankh-Morpork, while oddly enough knowing whom to give second chances to, is just applause-worthy.

Thud!: Discworld #34

Another one from City Watch, this one has a new character in it: a vampire joins the Watch! In the book, politics is thrust upon Vimes much to his annoyance, where he’s forced to hire Sally, and also deal with a problem between the dwarves and trolls when the subject of Koom Valley comes up. While the political arc is actually pretty interesting, it’s the human elements in the book – as with the others – that keep you engaged. Angua showing her insecurity, in a way, of Sally’s preening for Carrot, who’s oblivious to everything but the case and Angua’s well-being; Vimes wanting to be home at 6pm every day so he can read a book to his son; and a troll who just wants to understand what’s happening around him… The conclusion is pretty amazing, and hey, Death makes an appearance!

Wintersmith: Discworld #35

We’re in the third Tiffany Aching book, and I have slowly warmed up to this character. In this book, she makes a mistake. And because of it, the Wintersmith has fallen in love – with her! But this is causing havoc to the natural order of things, and it’s up to Tiffany to fix it and bring back the person he was meant to dance the dance with. Super happy to see Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg back again. It’s a bit of a coming-of-age story of sorts, but while it was a good read, it wasn’t a memorable one – for me.

Note: there is a 34.5, called Where’s My Cow? but I wasn’t able to obtain a copy, so haven’t penned anything on it.

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