Welcome to the next installment of my Discworld adventure… 

OK so it’s definitely been a while since I updated this. But here are the next 10 (instead of five) in the Discworld series. I’m currently reading #33 – not long until the end!

Earlier installments: Books 1-4, Books 5-10, Books 11-15, Books 16-20

Jingo: Discworld #21

This is part of the City Watch series, and it’s essentially quite anti-war – which is great! Ankh-Morpork and Klatch look like they’re going to war, and it all gets messier and messier by the day. Vetinari has a meaty role in this one, and we get to see Leonard of Quirm get involved as well. Very pertinent, as using words and comedy, Pratchett deals with the issues of war, racism and much more ‘real world’ to get a point across.

The Last Continent: Discworld #22

OK I actually didn’t like this, which is surprising. I rarely NOT like a Pratchett book, I just think they’re average. This one, however… So it’s the sixth in the Rincewind series, which is already frustrating because if you’ve read my previous posts, you’ll know I don’t like Rincewind very much! So this book is based in a continent that is suspiciously similar to Australia, but I felt like the jokes fell flat and it seemed all a little bit forced. As if it was easy to pick stereotypes or common jokes for this one. I’m also not 100% sure what the plot was all about!

The Sea and The Little Fishes: Discworld #22.5

A short story with the Witches of Discworld – I highly, highly recommend you read this. It’s focused on Granny Weatherwax and the annual Witch Trials, which she has been winning year after year after year. This year, the other witches want her to sit out. And then Granny Weatherwax turns terrifyingly…nice…to everyone. Find out more, you will enjoy this.

Carpe Jugulum: Discworld #23

I LOVED THIS BOOK! This is the sixth in the Witches series within Discworld, and it was an absolute joy to read. So, King Verence of Lancre and Magrat have had a child together, and as part of the celebrations, the Magpyrs of Uberwald show up – with his Verence’s invite of course. But these are ‘modern’ vampires, who like the sun and eat garlic. And they don’t want to leave. Agnes Nitt has a meaty role in this one, and of course, Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg jump into the fray to save their home from the vampires. If there’s ANY vampire fiction you must read, make it this one. Plus: I’ve just found out this is the last of the Witches series (but not the last you’ll read of the Witches, so never fear)!

The Fifth Elephant: Discworld #24

Another one from the City Watch – I really, really enjoyed this book. I think it’s because Carrot and Angua have some meaty roles in this one, and they’re among some of my favourite characters. In Ankh-Morpork a scone is stolen from the Dwarf Museum, and while the Watch are trying to figure out why, off to Uberwald goes Vimes and Sybil as representatives of Ankh-Morpork. It’s time for the Low King of the Dwarfs to be crowned. But Angua mysteriously disappears and Carrot, naturally, tries to find her. And…they head for Uberwald too. What happens next, amidst diplomacy, werewolves and vampires? This book is an absolute blast.

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My well-thumbed copy

The Truth: Discworld #25
OK so I’m totally biased with this book, purely because of my chosen profession. William de Worde (on that note, I just LOVE all the character names in the Discworld books). BTW this is part of the ‘Industrial Revolution’ series, which we’ve already come across with ‘Moving Pictures’, the tenth book in the overall Disc-verse. So de Worde is a person who sends reports, if you will, of happenings in the city to a number of people who pay him for it. And then, somehow, almost by accident, he ends up running Ankh-Morpork’s first newspaper, and becomes a journalist, with his nose to the ground for a good story. And then, there’s a murder… Honestly, even if you don’t like or read Pratchett’s Discworld series, definitely pick up this one if you work or are associated with the media industry. It’s such a fun story, with elements that you might actually identify with!

Thief of Time: Discworld #26

While this is part of the Death sub-series, there was more reading time for Susan, Death’s granddaughter than Death himself. That’s fine in itself, but I didn’t enjoy this book that much. I’m not exactly sure what it was, but I think I felt that the characters were going through the motions and there wasn’t much development or chemistry between them. In this book, a clock that could potentially stop time is being built, and the Auditors are involved. Susan sets out to stop them, and we even visit – through Death – the other members of the Riders of the Apocalypse. Nanny Ogg also makes an appearance – which was very cool btw.

The Last Hero: Discworld #27

So it’s another Rincewind book. It wasn’t all bad though (see: previous comments on not enjoying Rincewind books) – it’s tempered with the presence of Heroes. It’s time for Cohen the Barbarian to go on his final quest, with a band of old friends. They set off for the highest mountain within the Discworld – to meet the gods! The Last Hero is Cohen, who is determined to return to the gods something that the First Hero stole. And because Vetinari believes this will bring about the end of the world… he’s determined to stop them. With the ragtag team of Captain Carrot and Leonard of Quirm – and unfortunately, Rincewind – and assisted by Ponder Stibbons. Do they succeed?

The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents: Discworld #28

I believe this is the first young adult novel that Pratchett wrote, and I absolutely loved it. Think Pied Piper with a Pratchett twist. Maurice the cat can talk (and we have encountered talking animals in the Discworld before) and so can the rats he hangs out with. This motley crew works with a young boy to scam towns or villages into thinking the boy can get rid of a rat infestation with his cat. But one town isn’t as straightforward as it seems… there they meet a young girl who joins them on an adventure which leads them to a mysterious and strangely powerful monster that no one can see. It’s funny as always, and despite being a young adult book, it does deal with fairly dark or serious themes – but then, quite a few Pratchett books do that. A book I’d really, really recommend.

Night Watch: Discworld #29

Part of The City Watch series, this is potentially one of my favourite City Watch books for the pure human drama. In this book, Vimes and his team were in pursuit of a serial killer, and in a series of unfortunate events, both are, essentially, thrown back in time. To a specific point in Ankh-Morpork’s bloody history, where Vimes – shall we say – meets people from his past. But will his actions change the  future? We shall see. The time travel element adds a nice twist, and it’s a book that will make you think, and maybe cry. Enjoy it.

The Wee Free Men: Discworld #30

This book marks the introduction of a new sub-series within the Discword: Tiffany Aching. A new witch! It’s defnitely aimed at a younger reader (I mean, it was in the young adult section of my library), so I’m not sure it was completely my cup of tea. However, as in Pratchett tradtiion, the writing is excellent. In this book, Tiffany finds herself working with the Wee Free Men, the Nac Mac Feegle who live in the Chalk (where she lives) to find her kidnapped brother. To do this, they must venture into Fairyland, and face the Queen of the Elves. What I really liked about this book was Tiffany’s characterisation – she’s a no-nonsense, sensible girl who is extremely curious and resourceful. It’s a great way to introduce a younger person to the joys of Terry Pratchett, and with a strong, intelligent female character no doubt. However, toward the end, I felt like it was a bit tedious to read, and I skimmed over a couple of pages.

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